Photo: Kayle Crosson

‘We shouldn’t have to protest – politicians should have acted already’

May 30th, 2019

The #FridaysForFuture movement saw school children from 118 countries across the globe take to the streets on May 24th in order to push governments towards taking serious Climate Action.

In the wake of Ireland recently calling a National Climate and Biodiversity Emergency, the Irish fraction of the movement have released a list of demands.

Such demands include a halt to the prioritisation of economic growth over the survival of species, educating students in primary and post-primary about climate issues and increased media coverage on climate disruption.

The group are also calling for a complete move away from the use of fossil fuels in Ireland and the introduction of alternative energy sources.

We spoke to some of the children who protested in Merrion square about what they want to see happen for the future of the climate.

Gráinne O’Sullivan Photo: Marianne Foody

Gráinne O’Sullivan from Bray, Co. Wicklow

“I’ve come out here today because I feel that it’s a very important issue and I don’t think that the Government is doing enough to act on that because they’re taking away our future and that’s not fair because it’s our future.

“We’re going to have to tell our children that we were able to act but the governments didn’t do anything about it and that’s not fair on us. [The Government’s] going to die of old age but we are going to die of climate change and it’s our future that they are taking away from us.”

“I just feel that’s a very important issue, as it should be. We shouldn’t have to be out here marching as students – politicians should already have done something about it.’’

Ruby Gill (l) and Zuzanna (r) Stronk Photo: Marianne Foody

Ruby Gill and Zuzanna Stronk, St Mary’s Secondary, Glasnevin

“We’re out here protesting today because it’s our generation that is going to be the most affected by it and officially the earth is going to be completely changed in 236 months and that’s way too close.

“Some of us could be five or six – I’m 14 and we still have our whole lives to live and we can’t live on an earth that’s slowly disintegrating you know?

“So we’re here trying to undo what’s been done over so many years – we have to stop using so much plastic [and] fossil fuels. So we’re here protesting today to try to get parliament to officially stop this and stop the nonsense – basically to cop on.’’

Éile Ní Chianain and Imogen Casey Photo: Marianna Foody
Éile Ní Chianain (l) and Imogen Casey (r) Photo: Marianna Foody

Éile Ní Chianain and Imogen Casey

“I think it’s important to be out here today because it’s basically our future that we’re fighting for. Honestly I don’t think that it’s an option to not fight for is because it’s important for future generations .’’

“I don’t think that politicians are fighting enough – in the last couple of months, young people have been using our voices so much and I think it’s great to be participating in something like this.”

Eala Craven (L) Claire Murry (C) Sandra Dunlik (R) Photo: Marianna Foody

Eala Craven, Claire Murry, and Sandra Dunlik, Co Dublin

“We’re protesting because we feel like there’s not enough being done to protect the climate and it’s really important that we cut down our use of carbon because we’re destroying the ozone layer.’’

“It’s getting so bad that our lives will be affected and it’s just not fair that all the politicians are over a certain age and so they don’t care because their lives won’t be affected so they’re not doing enough to help us and future generations.’’

By Marianne Foody

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